San Pedro Still Lifes

photo by Benjamin Mayer

They’re the things we see every day, yet don’t.

The places we take for granted, like the homes and cars we pass while going to work every morning. Or the strip malls we drive by while running errands, unnoticeable unless we have a reason to give them our full attention.

For German-born photojournalist Tim Maxeiner, it’s these simple, nondescript spots that he finds interesting. So interesting that he put together a photo book featuring still lifes of various San Pedro homes and automobiles, aptly titled (from a German translation) Home Alone.

“I like to take pictures of every day things that are somehow fascinating to me,” he says over coffee at Sacred Grounds one morning last month, “because it makes life more fun if you’re fascinated by really simple things you see every day, you know?”

Looking at Maxeiner, 26, you wouldn’t peg him as an artist. Standing a few inches taller than six-feet, the slender, messy bleach blonde haired photographer is just as comfortable catching waves on a surfboard as he is capturing moments with his camera.

The book is chockfull with images from various parts of San Pedro, including Point Fermin, South Shores, Vista del Oro and downtown. Each of the exactly 99 photographs includes one home or business and a car (or two) parked outside in front or on the side, depending on the angle.

Aside from a handful of businesses featured, no addresses, street names or license plates are visible. Unless you’re from San Pedro, the cars and homes could be from Anywhere, USA.

The project started as most projects worth their artistic merit do, with Maxeiner waking up one morning last year asking himself, “What am I going to do today?”

“I start walking around whenever I go to a new place,” he says. “So I took my camera with me and looked around and really liked the San Pedro architecture. It’s really diverse, from really old to brand new. And I always had this idea of old cars. I just like the look of old cars.”

photos by Tim Maxeiner

So Maxeiner started walking around town shooting photos. One photo turned into five, which turned into 20, which turned into something he thought might make for an interesting book. A noted photojournalist in Germany, he decided to pitch the idea to a few German book publishers. The imprint Delius Klasing, which touts itself as “Europe’s largest family-run special-interest media company,” responded right away and offered Maxeiner a book deal, printing a limited run of 2,000 copies of Home Alone.

But getting to that point took a bit of time. The way he explains it, Maxeiner’s journey from the outskirts of Frankfurt to San Pedro is something out of a movie.

He fell in love with surfing at an early age, after discovering the sport and living vicariously through surf magazines his father would buy for him. When he was old enough, he took a sojourn to France where he picked up the sport for real, learning to catch waves on the French beaches. But what he really wanted to do was come to America, more specifically… Southern California.

“Southern California is such a great place where you have all these possibilities,” he says. “That’s why everything comes from here, especially from this area. If you look at youth culture, skateboarding, surfing, music, the punk rock scene, it all comes from here.”

After finishing school and saving some money through odd jobs, Maxeiner took a trip to Canada and worked at a ski resort, knowing it was easier to obtain a work permit there than in the U.S. While in Canada, he and a friend decided they wanted to go surfing and drove to Baja California from Vancouver, hitting the waves at every surf spot along the way. Picking up the journalism bug from his father, Maxeiner decided to chronicle that journey and sold the story to a German car magazine.

After a few more back-and-forth trips and a few more bylines about the surf and car culture of America that he sold to various German publications, Maxeiner decided he wanted to make Southern California his home. Now an established photojournalist, Maxeiner obtained a journalist visa and established himself in San Pedro.

“I took a map of Los Angeles and I was like, what is Palos Verdes? And then I saw San Pedro next to the harbor,” he recalls. “I drove up 7th Street and saw a sign for a room for rent. I knocked on the door, talked to the guy and he said if I wanted the room, I could have it. I told him I’d call him later, then I left and drove up the hill and saw the coastline and instantly turned around, drove back to the place and said I’d take it.”

The rest, as they say, is history, which is also a subject near and dear to Maxeiner’s heart.

“I love history over here because it’s so young,” he says. “In Germany, everything is so old. Here, you can still talk to people who can recall what [the early days] here were like.”

To keep himself busy, Maxeiner is currently working on a photo project with the San Pedro Bay Historical Society and has been doing video work for a few local businesses.

On Saturday, April 13, Maxeiner will host an event celebrating Home Alone at the Le Grand Salon in the Arcade Building in downtown, located at 479 W. 6th St. Light refreshments will be served and books will be available for purchase.

“I’m really interested in the simple stories of life,” he says. “I want people to look through Home Alone and say, ‘I know somebody who lives in this house. I know somebody that owns that car.’ I’m really open to everything and if somebody asks me to take a picture of their family in front of their car, I’m honored to do it.” spt

Pedro Parking: A Photo Book Presentation of Home Alone is Saturday, April 13 at 6 p.m. at the Le Grand Salon (479 W. 6th St.). For more info on Tim Maxeiner, visit www.timmaxeiner.com.

Ace In The Hole

Terry Katnic (center) surrounded by his Ace Hardware staff. (photo by John Mattera)

Since the introduction of big box, do-it-yourself stores, such as Lowe’s and The Home Depot, the landscape of the American hardware store has changed.

Although independently operated hardware stores and pure hardware chains continue to find a healthy niche, the big do-it-yourself stores have dominated revenues. That didn’t stop or deter Terry Katnic from coming out of retirement and following his dream.

Katnic, in August of 2011, opened one of San Pedro’s newest, most dynamic small businesses, and he opened it under a name that everyone could recognize — Ace Hardware.

Located at 2515 S. Western Avenue, previous home of Hollywood Video, South Shores Ace Hardware is a business Katnic said he couldn’t be “prouder of.”

“The first year was hard, it was a daily struggle,” he says. “But now we are established, people, the community know we are here — and things lately have been going right.”

Katnic celebrated Ace Hardware’s one-year anniversary on August 23. He says in a community like San Pedro, “anything is possible.”

“We are getting a lot of support from the community,” he says. “People come in and say, ‘We are so happy you’re here!’ This is the key to opening a successful small business, it is all about the community you are serving.”

It’s also about location.

In this area of town, Katnic says, there hasn’t been a hardware store for years.

“There was a hardware store on this side of town for 25 years, but the economy took its toll and they had to close their doors,” he says. “It left a hole, and it was something that not only I, but the community noticed.”

When Hollywood Video closed its doors, Katnic knew it was now or never.

“I literally watched the ‘Closed’ signed go up at Hollywood Video and I knew it was my opportunity to put in a hardware store,” he says. “This is a great location, an amazing building and it couldn’t have been a better opportunity.”

A second generation San Pedran, Katnic knows exactly what goes into the opening and success of a small business. Previously in the auto parts distribution industry, Katnic spent 30 years working across the Los Angeles area serving six stores. He sold his interest in the business in 1998, and his professional career took a turn.

Katnic, who wanted a change, obtained a license to sell both life and health insurance. He says it was a great choice, as it made “life easier, and was not as demanding as my previous line of work.” It was a career Katnic says he was proud of, but the entrepreneur in him wasn’t done.

Ace Hardware, Katnic says, has been another life change. He works on average 80 hours a week, and that’s at the ripe age of 60.

“People asked me all the time if I was out of my mind,” he says. “But I love it, I am a hard worker, and I am always up for a challenge.”

Katnic says he is a part of a franchise that he is proud of – he is 100 percent owner. The company, Ace Hardware, operates as a co-op.

He says from the beginning he has been impressed with Ace Hardware – and as his business has turned one, he is an even bigger fan of the company.

“The J.D. Power award for Highest in Customer Satisfaction has been won by Ace Hardware for the last six years,” he says. “We really cater to people, to our customers. My employees don’t just disappear and hide, they work with the customers.”

He continues, “In addition, the logistics are amazing, the company employs 900 people. There are 4,400 stores in America, all independently owned. They give us the plan, but we are all entrepreneurs.”

But he says starting a business takes time and patience.

“It’s a learning curve, an undertaking, starting a new business,” he says. “It’s a commitment to sign a lease, but I never had doubt or fear – I never doubted that this would be a successful business and that is the mindset you have to have.”

Although very happy with his decision, and the success his store has had in the first year, Katnic knows that he needs the continued support of his community to make his store ever lasting.

“Sometimes people forget that in this hard economic time, I took a huge chance,” he says. “The end result is that I employ 10 people. I opened this convenience hardware store for myself and for the neighborhood. I believe in Ace Hardware and I want the community to believe in me.”

At the same time, Katnic recognizes and is overwhelmed with the support he has received.

“This community has been tremendously supportive, and without that support this store isn’t open,” he says. spt

South Shores Ace Hardware is located at 2515 S. Western Ave., Ste. 101. For more info, call (310) 833-1223 or visit www.southshoresace.com.