San Pedro Still Lifes

photo by Benjamin Mayer

They’re the things we see every day, yet don’t.

The places we take for granted, like the homes and cars we pass while going to work every morning. Or the strip malls we drive by while running errands, unnoticeable unless we have a reason to give them our full attention.

For German-born photojournalist Tim Maxeiner, it’s these simple, nondescript spots that he finds interesting. So interesting that he put together a photo book featuring still lifes of various San Pedro homes and automobiles, aptly titled (from a German translation) Home Alone.

“I like to take pictures of every day things that are somehow fascinating to me,” he says over coffee at Sacred Grounds one morning last month, “because it makes life more fun if you’re fascinated by really simple things you see every day, you know?”

Looking at Maxeiner, 26, you wouldn’t peg him as an artist. Standing a few inches taller than six-feet, the slender, messy bleach blonde haired photographer is just as comfortable catching waves on a surfboard as he is capturing moments with his camera.

The book is chockfull with images from various parts of San Pedro, including Point Fermin, South Shores, Vista del Oro and downtown. Each of the exactly 99 photographs includes one home or business and a car (or two) parked outside in front or on the side, depending on the angle.

Aside from a handful of businesses featured, no addresses, street names or license plates are visible. Unless you’re from San Pedro, the cars and homes could be from Anywhere, USA.

The project started as most projects worth their artistic merit do, with Maxeiner waking up one morning last year asking himself, “What am I going to do today?”

“I start walking around whenever I go to a new place,” he says. “So I took my camera with me and looked around and really liked the San Pedro architecture. It’s really diverse, from really old to brand new. And I always had this idea of old cars. I just like the look of old cars.”

photos by Tim Maxeiner

So Maxeiner started walking around town shooting photos. One photo turned into five, which turned into 20, which turned into something he thought might make for an interesting book. A noted photojournalist in Germany, he decided to pitch the idea to a few German book publishers. The imprint Delius Klasing, which touts itself as “Europe’s largest family-run special-interest media company,” responded right away and offered Maxeiner a book deal, printing a limited run of 2,000 copies of Home Alone.

But getting to that point took a bit of time. The way he explains it, Maxeiner’s journey from the outskirts of Frankfurt to San Pedro is something out of a movie.

He fell in love with surfing at an early age, after discovering the sport and living vicariously through surf magazines his father would buy for him. When he was old enough, he took a sojourn to France where he picked up the sport for real, learning to catch waves on the French beaches. But what he really wanted to do was come to America, more specifically… Southern California.

“Southern California is such a great place where you have all these possibilities,” he says. “That’s why everything comes from here, especially from this area. If you look at youth culture, skateboarding, surfing, music, the punk rock scene, it all comes from here.”

After finishing school and saving some money through odd jobs, Maxeiner took a trip to Canada and worked at a ski resort, knowing it was easier to obtain a work permit there than in the U.S. While in Canada, he and a friend decided they wanted to go surfing and drove to Baja California from Vancouver, hitting the waves at every surf spot along the way. Picking up the journalism bug from his father, Maxeiner decided to chronicle that journey and sold the story to a German car magazine.

After a few more back-and-forth trips and a few more bylines about the surf and car culture of America that he sold to various German publications, Maxeiner decided he wanted to make Southern California his home. Now an established photojournalist, Maxeiner obtained a journalist visa and established himself in San Pedro.

“I took a map of Los Angeles and I was like, what is Palos Verdes? And then I saw San Pedro next to the harbor,” he recalls. “I drove up 7th Street and saw a sign for a room for rent. I knocked on the door, talked to the guy and he said if I wanted the room, I could have it. I told him I’d call him later, then I left and drove up the hill and saw the coastline and instantly turned around, drove back to the place and said I’d take it.”

The rest, as they say, is history, which is also a subject near and dear to Maxeiner’s heart.

“I love history over here because it’s so young,” he says. “In Germany, everything is so old. Here, you can still talk to people who can recall what [the early days] here were like.”

To keep himself busy, Maxeiner is currently working on a photo project with the San Pedro Bay Historical Society and has been doing video work for a few local businesses.

On Saturday, April 13, Maxeiner will host an event celebrating Home Alone at the Le Grand Salon in the Arcade Building in downtown, located at 479 W. 6th St. Light refreshments will be served and books will be available for purchase.

“I’m really interested in the simple stories of life,” he says. “I want people to look through Home Alone and say, ‘I know somebody who lives in this house. I know somebody that owns that car.’ I’m really open to everything and if somebody asks me to take a picture of their family in front of their car, I’m honored to do it.” spt

Pedro Parking: A Photo Book Presentation of Home Alone is Saturday, April 13 at 6 p.m. at the Le Grand Salon (479 W. 6th St.). For more info on Tim Maxeiner, visit www.timmaxeiner.com.

Check My Custom Machines

Ron Binkley photographed with his latest project, a canary-yellow 1938 Cadillac La- Salle, 2-door Opera Coupe. (photo by Valerie Electra Smith-Griffin)

The layers in-between the lip-smacking cake that’s our town are its people, such as Pedro-blooded Ron Binkley, a non-stop cars and electronics tinker who once played a mean electric keyboard and danced the night away with an alluring woman known only as Midnight at the now vanished Canetti’s Restaurant.

It’s a typical gray mist-laden morning, and Binkley replaces the baritone, two-tone foghorn once known as “Moaning Maggie” with the commanding startup of his most reliable 1971 Ford Torino Station Wagon, its wheels whirling off to San Pedro’s Sacred Grounds, his personal haunt for his ritualistic cup of high octane. It’s a happening destination where he celebrates the day with relished camaraderie consisting of long-time friends and his kids who enjoy sharing the day with Pappy. After toasting the sunrise with Columbian and cream, he returns to his home that’s chockfull of cars, a mish-mash of machinery and a plethora of photographic memories spread across a thick wooden table that is laden not with salt and pepper shakers, placemats and artificial fruit, but hundreds of faded Kodacolor, sepia-tone and grainy black and whites of cars, machinery, wars past and family, collaged and creating a watercolor wash that are the festive colors of Binkley, whose lead foot is glued on the accelerator pedal of life; his fervor for all things cars, and the restoration of engines and drive trains ever-smoldering.

The Gilbert Electric Train Set, Slinky, or that extra special toy packaged with a barrage of sexual curiosity questions, the Doctor and Nurses Kit, magnetized many kids of the 1940s but not necessarily so for our mechanical-minded Binkley. Reflecting on his mother’s memory, Binkley says, “In 1940, at the age of three, I found car parts in an alley and, using a board, rolled them up into my crib.” For Binkley, his fascination with vehicles and machinery visibly evolved from a curious childhood habit into a lifelong emotional, and some might add, spiritual attachment.

In his early teens, Binkley worked as an usher at the Warner Grand Theatre where he played piano for the 1950 movie premier, South Sea Sinner, which also starred Liberace. Other jobs included Howard Cross Auto Repair and 7th Street Garage. In 1959, his strong interests in electronics and aerospace were further stimulated at Ryan Aeronautical Company, best known for building Charles Lindberg’s “Spirit of St. Louis” for his illustrious 1927 transatlantic flight. Always one that harbored a now realized yearning to witness man’s flight to the moon and beyond, he worked on the Doppler Radar for the Lunar Lander until he was drafted into the army, then returned to Ryan and onto Vickers Aerospace as an instrumentation technician on the Gemini Space Capsule. He retired in 1998 as foreman of the Radar and Antenna Restoration Division in the Electronics Weapons Facility at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard.

Binkley’s cars read like classic commercials from Cal Worthington and his fantasy dog Spot, but unlike Worthington, he won’t stand on his head, and don’t expect to see a Smart Car, which to Binkley, is an abomination of the greatest kind. As we peruse his aisles we see his 1968 Buick Special complete with a Buick 350 V-8. Interested in a 1931 Model A, or perhaps a Ford 1955 F100 Truck? The head-turning 1947 Cadillac Fleetwood Convertible that was advertised last week flew off the lot, but that snazzy 1938 Cadillac 75 series Coupe that was one of forty-two cars ever built, and survived the London Blitz, is waiting for you to drive it away, as is the 1964 1/2 Mustang and the 1940 Cadillac ’62 series with a L-Head V-8.

“My cars must have noise, that’s why I install duel exhaust and headers on all of them. It’s like beautiful music to my ears,” says Binkley.

Perhaps a 1974 Plymouth Gold Duster is more to your liking, or a head-turning 1969 purple Cadillac El Dorado with a no-nonsense 472 engine. Yearning to nourish your inner diva? Try an eye-popping 1961 Chevrolet Impala Convertible, it’s the one Binkley used to chauffeur former Councilwoman Janice Hahn in the San Pedro Christmas parades, and it comes complete with a 348 V-8 engine and 4-barrel carburetor. Still perplexed as to what honks your horn? Try a 1938 Cadillac La Salle Opera Coupe, complete with a 1942 military tank engine, or its earlier LaSalle cousin from 1937. If you crave a 1936 Ford 4-door sedan with the 1949 Olds V-8 and 1937 LaSalle transmission, sorry pal, that one flew off the lot as fast as its scorching wheels could go.

In addition to the artful cars just mentioned, Binkley is also the proud owner of two, 700 pounds each, solid stainless steel, early model nuclear submarine periscope foundations, complete with floor plates that display 360 degree markings. Perhaps they’ll eventually come in handy as lawn statues. Seriously, pink flamingos are so yesterday.

Binkley reflects on his prize car. “Without hesitation, one of my favorites was the one I purchased from Cecil Thomas and Sons on Pacific Avenue in San Pedro. A 1936 Ford 4-door sedan for $49.” Being the modification surgeon that he is, he rebuilt the engine with an Oldsmobile overhead valve V-8, a rear-end from a 1941 Cadillac LaSalle transmission, duel 4-barrel carburetors and a drive shaft from a 1932 Cadillac V-12. The track of Lions Drag Strip (1955-1972) in the Wilmington district, adjacent to Long Beach, whose slogan was “Drive the Highways, Race at Lions”, paved the way for the revamped car. “My lifelong friends, Billy Stecker, the late Jack Stecker, Frank Iacono and Tom Taros are 1940s and 1950s drag racing world icons and without Taros, all the hot rodders wouldn’t have a place to go.”

Lions Drag Strip is now a ghostly image in Binkley’s rearview mirror and his Canetti’s nights are kept alive in lively remembrances at Sacred Grounds with friends who frequently slip in a friendly barb of, “Can’t you find another subject besides cars to talk about?” Ignoring the question, he downs his final sip of Columbian and cream, eager to make a mad dash home and determined to breathe new life into his latest project, a canary-yellow 1938 Cadillac LaSalle, 2-door Opera Coupe. Care for a ride anyone? Take Binkley’s word for it, once you hear the engine roar and caress that velvety burgundy mohair interior, you haven’t lived! spt