San Pedro Still Lifes

photo by Benjamin Mayer

They’re the things we see every day, yet don’t.

The places we take for granted, like the homes and cars we pass while going to work every morning. Or the strip malls we drive by while running errands, unnoticeable unless we have a reason to give them our full attention.

For German-born photojournalist Tim Maxeiner, it’s these simple, nondescript spots that he finds interesting. So interesting that he put together a photo book featuring still lifes of various San Pedro homes and automobiles, aptly titled (from a German translation) Home Alone.

“I like to take pictures of every day things that are somehow fascinating to me,” he says over coffee at Sacred Grounds one morning last month, “because it makes life more fun if you’re fascinated by really simple things you see every day, you know?”

Looking at Maxeiner, 26, you wouldn’t peg him as an artist. Standing a few inches taller than six-feet, the slender, messy bleach blonde haired photographer is just as comfortable catching waves on a surfboard as he is capturing moments with his camera.

The book is chockfull with images from various parts of San Pedro, including Point Fermin, South Shores, Vista del Oro and downtown. Each of the exactly 99 photographs includes one home or business and a car (or two) parked outside in front or on the side, depending on the angle.

Aside from a handful of businesses featured, no addresses, street names or license plates are visible. Unless you’re from San Pedro, the cars and homes could be from Anywhere, USA.

The project started as most projects worth their artistic merit do, with Maxeiner waking up one morning last year asking himself, “What am I going to do today?”

“I start walking around whenever I go to a new place,” he says. “So I took my camera with me and looked around and really liked the San Pedro architecture. It’s really diverse, from really old to brand new. And I always had this idea of old cars. I just like the look of old cars.”

photos by Tim Maxeiner

So Maxeiner started walking around town shooting photos. One photo turned into five, which turned into 20, which turned into something he thought might make for an interesting book. A noted photojournalist in Germany, he decided to pitch the idea to a few German book publishers. The imprint Delius Klasing, which touts itself as “Europe’s largest family-run special-interest media company,” responded right away and offered Maxeiner a book deal, printing a limited run of 2,000 copies of Home Alone.

But getting to that point took a bit of time. The way he explains it, Maxeiner’s journey from the outskirts of Frankfurt to San Pedro is something out of a movie.

He fell in love with surfing at an early age, after discovering the sport and living vicariously through surf magazines his father would buy for him. When he was old enough, he took a sojourn to France where he picked up the sport for real, learning to catch waves on the French beaches. But what he really wanted to do was come to America, more specifically… Southern California.

“Southern California is such a great place where you have all these possibilities,” he says. “That’s why everything comes from here, especially from this area. If you look at youth culture, skateboarding, surfing, music, the punk rock scene, it all comes from here.”

After finishing school and saving some money through odd jobs, Maxeiner took a trip to Canada and worked at a ski resort, knowing it was easier to obtain a work permit there than in the U.S. While in Canada, he and a friend decided they wanted to go surfing and drove to Baja California from Vancouver, hitting the waves at every surf spot along the way. Picking up the journalism bug from his father, Maxeiner decided to chronicle that journey and sold the story to a German car magazine.

After a few more back-and-forth trips and a few more bylines about the surf and car culture of America that he sold to various German publications, Maxeiner decided he wanted to make Southern California his home. Now an established photojournalist, Maxeiner obtained a journalist visa and established himself in San Pedro.

“I took a map of Los Angeles and I was like, what is Palos Verdes? And then I saw San Pedro next to the harbor,” he recalls. “I drove up 7th Street and saw a sign for a room for rent. I knocked on the door, talked to the guy and he said if I wanted the room, I could have it. I told him I’d call him later, then I left and drove up the hill and saw the coastline and instantly turned around, drove back to the place and said I’d take it.”

The rest, as they say, is history, which is also a subject near and dear to Maxeiner’s heart.

“I love history over here because it’s so young,” he says. “In Germany, everything is so old. Here, you can still talk to people who can recall what [the early days] here were like.”

To keep himself busy, Maxeiner is currently working on a photo project with the San Pedro Bay Historical Society and has been doing video work for a few local businesses.

On Saturday, April 13, Maxeiner will host an event celebrating Home Alone at the Le Grand Salon in the Arcade Building in downtown, located at 479 W. 6th St. Light refreshments will be served and books will be available for purchase.

“I’m really interested in the simple stories of life,” he says. “I want people to look through Home Alone and say, ‘I know somebody who lives in this house. I know somebody that owns that car.’ I’m really open to everything and if somebody asks me to take a picture of their family in front of their car, I’m honored to do it.” spt

Pedro Parking: A Photo Book Presentation of Home Alone is Saturday, April 13 at 6 p.m. at the Le Grand Salon (479 W. 6th St.). For more info on Tim Maxeiner, visit www.timmaxeiner.com.

The Liar Is Out, Chapter Two Is In


We have a new show opening at Little Fish this month.

Well, it’s certainly not a new show; it’s a classic of American theatre. That’s one of the things we do at Little Fish, “New, Classic & Contemporary Works.” For those of you who have now pulled out your season brochures to see exactly what play I’m talking about, we apologize.

The second show in our 2013 season will not be The Liar. Some of you may be disappointed, and we’re sorry. It’s one of those, “Play titles subject to change based upon licensing availability” moments. Instead, we’re doing Chapter Two by Neil Simon. Some of you will be ecstatically happy because you love Neil Simon, and we haven’t produced any of his plays since 2003.

Why don’t we do more Neil Simon shows, you ask? After all, he is the world’s most successful playwright (Google it). And, really, that’s the reason right there. We feel his plays get a lot of stage time in the Los Angeles market, and we try to provide something different here in San Pedro. But we can’t always do the lesser-known and unknown shows. Our goal is to present a variety of pieces representing the spectrum of work that’s out there, including what we consider to be modern classics. Sometimes it’s easier to sell tickets to a show that people recognize. Our regulars may trust us when we produce those unknown titles, but it may be easier for them to convince friends who have never been to Little Fish to come see a show they recognize.

We’re hoping Chapter Two will bring in some new faces as well as all our regular folks. It’s a touching story about a second chance at romance. Who wouldn’t want to see that? We selected Chapter Two for the lovely story, and also because it has a small cast, an important consideration for us because even with the expanded stage area we gained with our latest renovation. We just don’t have room for 12 or more actors (our dressing room is tiny!). But we did take on the challenge of conveying multiple locations in this play, another difficulty in our limited space. You’ll have to come see the show to find out how we do it.

But in case you aren’t in the mood for Neil Simon and would prefer to see a lesser-known work, our first Series B (the series formerly known as Mid-week) show of the 2013 season also opens in March. See Rock City is the sequel to Last Train to Nibroc, our hit mid-week show from the fall of 2012. This year, you can also see Series B shows on the weekend (hence the name change from Mid-week Series) including one Sunday matinee performance. So no excuses not to see this charming love story.

And in the spirit of both “Classic” and “Lesser-Known,” did I mention we’re doing King John at Point Fermin this summer? You’re going to love it! spt